wgseligman: (Default)
In the past few years, modern pagans have started to reclaim their history. As Ronald Hutton points out, pagans have always had a strong sense of "history" (an interest in past events), but not always in "historicity" (understanding what actually happened, as opposed to what you wish had happened).

Hutton's Triumph of the Moon traces the factors that led to the founding of the modern Neopagan Witchcraft movement. Philip Heselton's Witchfather focused on the life of one important individual: Gerald Gardner. In other words, Hutton told us about the times, Heselton told us about a life.

Michael Lloyd's Bull of Heaven: The Mythic Life of Eddie Buczynski and the Rise of the New York Pagan does both.

Bookcases

Aug. 29th, 2013 01:00 pm
wgseligman: (Celtic garb)
My bookshelves were full of all the games I've purchased recently. The games had spilled over onto the floor, stashed in canvas bags so I could easily grab them to take to a friend's place or a game night.

A friend of mine had a couple of bookcases she had to give away. They were the same style as the Billy bookcases I already had. I took action.

Read more... )
wgseligman: (Ren Faire)
Today I received my copy of Deborah Lipp's memoirs, Merry Meet Again. Full disclosure: Deborah was one of my teachers, and we visit each other for rituals, tabletop games, etc.

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wgseligman: (Forest of Fear)
I just came back from seeing the movie. I'll get to the review, but first is the tale of my connection with Edgar Rice Burroughs' Mars.

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wgseligman: (tuxedo)
A few months ago, I donated almost 300 books to the Books For Soldiers program. It felt good, but the process was a bit complicated. In order to help others feel as good, I'm going to go over the complete soup-to-nuts procedure for donating books in the same way.

Please feel free to "boost the signal" and re-post this information.

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wgseligman: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] sabrinamari at Big Book Sale: Strong Sales, Book Reviews and Good Advice Needed!

Note from [livejournal.com profile] wgseligman: I've read the book, I think it's excellent, and I've reviewed it at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. 

My publisher is having a big book sale, and if you've been thinking about reading my book, this is a very good time to do it. Here's the deal:

75th Anniversary Special

Rutgers University Press is celebrating its founding in 1936 with a special online offer for our customers. Take 36% off the list price on all books you order from our website through June 25, 2011 (simply enter discount code 02ANNV11 in the shopping cart).

The link to the sale page is here:

http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/index.html

And the link to my book page is here:

http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/acatalog/Surviving_HIVAIDS_in_the_inner_city.html

I would love all suggestions about how to get the word out about this and encourage librarians and individuals to grab a copy.

I checked in with my publisher yesterday, and while sales aren't bad, they could really use a big boost. I appreciate anything you can do. Please offer your thoughts! Signal boosts are also very welcome.

Finally, I would be very grateful to those willing to do Amazon and Powells book reviews---if you'd like to review the book, please let me know.

I've asked a few wonderful people about this already, but I could use even more help in this area, particularly if you have an unusual/specifically focused perspective on HIV/AIDS, managing serious chronic illness, health care, women's health issues, resilience/surviving under really challenging conditions or social/cultural capital...

You can see some of the reviews that have been written already here:

http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-HIV-AIDS-Inner-City/dp/0813548926/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1308839226&sr=8-1

Thanks so much, my dears!
wgseligman: (Default)
Today I received a letter from one of the servicemen to whom I sent books. It was my first confirmation that the packages I sent arrived at their destinations.

It was a nice letter. It went over the categories of books I sent him, explaining how he appreciated each one. I was impressed; I hope he has an opportunity to write professionally in the future.

He also confirmed something that someone not in the military had told me: Outside of work, there's very little for the soldiers to do. I was worried that I'd sent too many books. I'm now assured that that's not the case!
wgseligman: (Default)
Wherein I engage in undue speculation on the fate of volumes that were set adrift about this weary world.

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wgseligman: (Default)
About four months ago, a small cut on my foot turned into a skin ulcer; I've already described the circumstances. Since then, I haven't been able to do much in the way of effective exercise.

Last week, my podiatrist told me: Give it one more week to all the wound to develop another layer or two of skin, and you can start your long walks again. This was great news! I couldn't have asked for a better birthday present. (This is a lie, but Joyce is booked.)

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wgseligman: (Default)
Yesterday was my birthday. As a birthday present to myself, I decided I would finally start shipping out books for BooksForSoldiers, as I'd promised myself I would.

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wgseligman: (Default)
I'm reorganizing my apartment. I bought three new book cases, donating those books I no longer need, and moving the remaining books to different shelves. 

This has its advantages. For one thing, all my Wicca-, pagan-, and magic-related books are in one place my students can access easily, in case they have to reference something.

It also has its disadvantages. The biggest one so far: What the heck happened to my copy of The Elements of Ritual?

Oh, well. I hope whoever has it now is getting some benefit from it.
wgseligman: (Default)
One of the regular players in my Munchkin game has brought up the idea of getting a group of friends together for some table-top role-playing ("D&D" to you youngsters). He even asked me if I'd be willing to be the gamesmaster.
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wgseligman: (Default)
I've spent the better part of the weekend moving furniture around in my apartment. It's Isaac's fault.

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wgseligman: (Default)
Fire Child: The Life and Magic of Maxine Sanders 'Witch Queen'

I've often claimed that Paul Thomas Anderson's Magnolia is the most dangerous movie ever made. The reason is that, after you watch it, you may have the overwhelming urge to tell the whole truth to the ones you love.

Fire Child is a dangerous book for any teacher of the Craft to read, because it can leave them with the feeling that they've short-changed their students; at least, if they haven't passed on the experiences that Maxine Sanders describes in this autobiography.
Read more... )

wgseligman: (Default)
I like to listen to audio books. I typically listen to books I've read more than a decade ago; the Harry Potter books are the main exception (Jim Dale is a fine reader). I listen to them when I drive, or when I do my exercise walks.

When I set up the order of the books in my playlist, I usually try to vary the mix as best I can: different authors, different time periods, different moods.

What I forgot to consider was whether two adjacent books have similar plot devices. I just finished listening to Inferno by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, which is set in Dante's description of Hell.  I've just started listening to Job: A Comedy of Justice by Robert Heinlein, which has several chapters set in another type of Hell; it's reserved for those who didn't follow the Gospel, but it's a not a place of punishment.

On top of that, I watched Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey a couple of nights ago, with yet another version of Hell: the moron rocker version.

I'll survive the experience. But right now, I'm a little deluged on moral instruction. I respectfully request that no one lecture me on Right and Wrong for a week or two.

wgseligman: (Default)
I must be one of the few Wiccans who's blogging on this day, yet is not discussing Samhain.  I've read some other Samhain-related blog posts, and found that those commentators spoke far more eloquently on the subject that I could.  I have a spare hour, so instead I'm writing on another topic that interests me.

I grew up on science fiction.  The first science-fiction book I ever read was The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet by Eleanor Cameron; it was given to me by my third-grade teacher.  I've been a reader of science fiction ever since. 

I reached adolescence on fantasy.  I don't recall the first "fantasy" novel I read per se, but I remember the first fantasy work of any significance to me: The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien.  I don't remember who first recommended the work to me, but I remember reading it when I was 14.  I've been a reader of fantasy ever since.

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William Seligman

March 2014

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